Landscape Contractor / Design Build Maintain

MAR 2018

LC/DBM provides landscape contractors with Educational, Imaginative and Practical information about their business, their employees, their machines and their projects.

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60 LC DBM Responding to new sci- ence, ASTM updated F2170 (Standard Test Method for Determining Relative Humid - ity in Concrete Floor Slabs…) reducing the mandatory wait period before getting official results from an RH moisture test of concrete slabs from 72 hours to 24 hours. This was possible after a study showed that readings at the one-day mark were statistically equal to readings at the three-day juncture. NRMCA's Digital Design Center Provides Free Guidance Permeable Pavement Effectiveness Tested Another Innovative Way to Reinforce Concrete Found Relative Humidity Test Results in Just 24 Hours I n f o r m a t i o n R e q u e s t # 5 3 0 The National Ready Mixed Concrete As- sociation's Concrete Design Center offers free project design and technical assistance to help contractors choose the right solution for a wide variety of applications. The center is staffed with engineers and architects that can run cost analy - ses of choosing concrete over other construc- tion materials. The free tool can help determine various specifications such as structural design, noise reduction, fire resistance and sustainability. http://buildwithstrength.com/design-center/ A recent study evaluated the success of three types of perme- able pavements: permeable asphalts (PA), permeable concretes (PC), and permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP) on flood mitigation. One of the measures that was assessed was the effect that "clogging," had in overall performance. The tests showed that clogging reduced the pavements' effectiveness in preventing surface runoff by 62–92%. PICP was found to be the least prone to becoming clogged. www.mdpi.com/2073- 4441/10/2/172 The practicality of infusing microscopic-sized nanocrys - tals from wood into concrete to make it stronger is about to get a true test as researchers from Purdue University are plan - ning to build a bridge in Califor- nia this spring with the mate- rial. The chosen reinforcement substance is cellulose nanocrys - tals, byproducts generated by the paper, bioenergy, agriculture and pulp industries.

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