Landscape Contractor / Design Build Maintain

JAN 2016

LC/DBM provides landscape contractors with Educational, Imaginative and Practical information about their business, their employees, their machines and their projects.

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January 2016 43 The city of Burleson, Texas, requires a permit for all retaining walls 2' in height or greater, and any wall less than 2' in height that supports permanent construction. For all walls that support perma- nent construction, an engineer's design is required. Any wall greater than 4' in height that supports permanent construction must be built using concrete. The city of New Orleans does not require a permit for a retain- ing wall less than 3' in height. All new constructions over 3' require plans from an architect or engineer. Buncombe County, N.C., requires plantings be incorporated into any retaining wall system with a height greater than 20'. The quantity of plants depends on the height of the system: as height in- creases, more plants are required. The plants must be selected from a pre-approved list, which is available on the county website. Any wall greater than 10' in height requires a certificate of compliance and a building permit. In St. Louis County, Mo., a permit is required for: any retaining wall that is greater than 3' in height from the top of the grade on the non-retained side to the top of the wall; any wall that is greater than 2' in height and supports a surcharge load such as a driveway or pool; any wall located less than or equal to its height from the prop- erty line; and any wall that has a fence or guardrail on the top of the wall when the combined height of the fence and wall is greater than 6'. Certain products are pre-approved for retaining wall systems, in- cluding select Versa-Lok, Pavestone, and Belgard systems. In Creve Coeur, Mo., part of St. Louis County, permits are required for all retaining walls with a height of over 2' - stricter than the county requirements. In cases such as these, the stricter requirements take precedence. The building commissioner and zoning enforcement officer from the city of Charlton, Mass., reminds contractors that if the wall will be within 100' of a wetland or 200' of a river, the project must be re- viewed under the Department of Environmental Protection. In that Above & Right: When geosynthetics are used, NCMA recommends that the length be at least 60 percent of the wall height or 4', whichever is greater. The vertical spacing should be at most 2', though this may vary depending on soil conditions. PHOTO: (RIGHT) BankSaverS

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