Landscape Contractor / Design Build Maintain

JAN 2016

LC/DBM provides landscape contractors with Educational, Imaginative and Practical information about their business, their employees, their machines and their projects.

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32 LC DBM out of redwood. The posts are 6" x 6" and the trellises are 1" x 1/2". Sierra installed the flagstone and brick pavers, the stone facings on the existing retaining walls, the fire pit with tree stump stools, and forti - fied and straightened all of the existing retaining walls. He also installed the footings for a pergola, while Vasquez himself built the pergola. "I created the design and had the overall vision and was on site do - ing observation and coordinating the different trades," Gliksman said. "I worked very closely with them (the workers) especially with the stone work, where I laid out the pattern of all the stones before they were laid." The stone used for the walls was a combination of Monterey Cream, Deer Creek and McGregor Lake ledgestone and Yosemite Quartzite — all from a local supplier, Bourget Brothers. The company also sized each stone piece to the builders' specifications. Sweetwater flagstone and brick were used as paving materials. Gliksman also included five enormous raised planter beds enclosed with COR-TEN steel in the project, all of them to grow vegetables be- cause her client is an avid vegetable gardener. The client's backyard also has many fruit trees, berry plants and grape vines, so it's a virtual "food grower's heaven," Gliksman said. Jaime Gracia, of Gracia Designs, fab- ricated the COR-TEN material for the raised planter boxes. "A natural water feature starts at the top level and meanders down to a pond below," she adds. "Giant boulders frame a fire pit and small and large logs are used for seating." Pacific Outdoor Living built the water feature; David Lightfoot in - stalled the irrigation system; Del Rey Electric put in the lighting; and Israel Inequez installed all the plants. The lights came from FX Luminaire. The plants, the boulders, rocks and pebbles in the water feature and fire pit, and the used brick on the landing between the upper and lower levels are all generic. Top, Left: Although the existing retaining walls were sturdy, they were cracked and unsightly. Gliksman had her work crew fortify the walls with rebar and concrete, and then laid stone by hand on the facing side of the existing wall, as well as its top. This gave the appearance that this feature is dry-stacked. Each piece was mortared in place, but not grouted. No footing was required for this fence job, because the existing retaining wall has one already in place. The stone used for the walls was a combination of Monterey Cream, Deer Creek and McGregor Lake ledgestone and Yosemite Quartzite — all from a local supplier, Bourget Brothers. The company also sized each stone piece to Gliksman's specifications. Top, Right: The 6" x 6" posts are buried in the ground and bolted to the existing wall, which already has a footing. So the fence is well supported by the wall, Gliksman said. Bottom, Left: Generic boulders, river rocks, gravel and pebbles were used for the bed of the manmade stream. Bottom, Right: Sheets of COR-TEN steel, fabricated by Jaime Gracia of Gracia Designs, were used to create raised planter beds. Francisco Sierra, a subcontractor, installed flagstone and brick paving materials, repaired and reinforced the existing retaining wall and handcrafted the new stonewall. DBM LC

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