Landscape Contractor / Design Build Maintain

OCT 2018

LC/DBM provides landscape contractors with Educational, Imaginative and Practical information about their business, their employees, their machines and their projects.

Issue link: https://landscapecontractor.epubxp.com/i/1035782

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 79 of 103

80 LCDBM Louisiana State University mechanical engineering profes- sor Guoqiang Li and his team of researchers have developed a polymer-based self-healing sealant for expansion joints in asphalt. The sealant is able to react to changes in the ambient tempera - ture. When the adjoining asphalt heats up and expands, the liquid polymer actually shrinks to prevent further cracking of the sur- rounding roadway. When the temperature drops, and the asphalt contracts again, the adhesive expands to fill out the remaining damaged area. https://tinyurl.com/yb37qhnk The University of Nevada, Reno used an automatic bricklaying robot, named SAM100, to aid in the construction of a new $35.5 million facility. A news article on the university's website states that the robot laid more than 60,000 of the project's estimated 100,000 bricks. SAM100 is capable of placing a mortared brick once every eight seconds, and aver- ages 200-250 bricks per hour; leading to a projected 50 percent reduction in construction time. Professor Develops Morphing Asphalt Sealant University of Nevada, Reno's Bricklaying Robot Texas A&M AgriLife Extension re- leased a 10-minute video on YouTube titled, "How to treat for crapemyrtle bark scale," that extensively covers the subject of treating the tree disease. Crapemyrtle bark scale effects the crape - myrtle tree and is a small, white insect that feeds off the bark, causing decreased blooms and a black/sooty bark appear- ance. The video covers two practical solutions to treating the pest: washing the bark and applying a specific insecti- cide. https://tinyurl.com/y8asdz8m Texas A&M Video on Treating Crapemyrtle Bark Scale In this picture, the wall of bricks is being constructed in the lower right and the large red arm picks up a brick from the trays on the top right. Then, the arm carrying the brick swings down and another smaller application applies the mortar. A video of the process can be viewed on the University of Nevada, Reno's website https://tinyurl. com/yc7pfdfk . PHOTO CREDIT: UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO Education Tidbits I n f o r m a t i o n R e q u e s t # 4 6 8

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Landscape Contractor / Design Build Maintain - OCT 2018